The English Civil War (1642-1651) started when Charles I raised his royal standard in Nottingham. The split between Charles and Parliament was such that neither side was willing to back down over the principles that they held and war was inevitable as a way in which all problems could be solved. The country split into those who supported the King and those who supported Parliament – the classic ingredients for a civil war. This blog will record my wargaming journey through the English Civil War using 28mm miniatures.

Monday, 6 March 2017

Sir Bevil Grenville's Regiment of Foote

Royalist Cornish Regiment of Foot serving with 
Hopton’s army on his famous 1643 campaign. 
Grenville's infantry fought for Hopton in a series of battles in south-western England during 1642-3. At the battle of Braddock Down in January 1643, Grenville led them in an uphill charge that won the battle for the Royalists. Hopton advanced into Devon but was surprised by Parliamentarian forces at Sourton Down in April 1643. Although the Royalists were routed, Grenville made a stand that saved their army from complete destruction. The Earl of Stamford then led a Parliamentarian invasion of Cornwall in May 1643 and took up a strong defensive position at Stratton. Grenville's knowledge of the local terrain enabled Hopton to mount a surprise dawn attack on Stamford's position. After a desperate struggle to reach the hilltop, the Royalists were victorious and the Parliamentarians were driven out of Cornwall.
In the summer of 1643, the Cornish army joined forces with a detachment from Oxford under the command of the Marquis of Hertford and Prince Maurice. The combined Royalist army marched eastwards against Sir William Waller, who occupied a commanding position at Lansdown Hill near Bath. Grenville's Cornish infantry stood firm when the Royalist cavalry was routed in the early stages of the battle, then Grenville led a counter-attack against the Parliamentarian position at the top of the hill. The Cornishmen succeeded in gaining the hilltop and forcing Waller to withdraw, but during the attack Grenville was wounded by a halberd blow to the head. He died from his wound the following day. Grenville's loss was a serious blow to the morale of the Cornish army, many of whom were killed in Prince Rupert's bloody assault on Bristol a few weeks after Lansdown.
Colours to to the rear!!

5 comments:

  1. From speaking with the previous reenactment Regimental Colonel John Caboche, I understand the regiment's pikemen paint the upper 6 ft of the pike with blue and white bands. On 28mm miniatures this wouldn't look effective, therefore, I painted the whole pike with the coloured bands. The flag on this regiment is unknown. As a result, I have simply applied some wargaming artistic licence and carried the colours on the pike onto the flag.

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  2. It makes a striking effect. Nicely done.

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    1. Might do the same for Grenville's regt next.

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  3. You are really cracking these out. Well done - I admire your production.

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    1. Life's too short to dilly dally : )

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